Zelkova sinica Schneid.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zelkova sinica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zelkova/zelkova-sinica/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

Genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
apiculate
With a short sharp point.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zelkova sinica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zelkova/zelkova-sinica/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

A deciduous tree 50 to 60 ft high, with a trunk up to 6 ft in girth; young shoots greyish woolly in the early part of the season, becoming bright brown and glabrous by autumn. Leaves firm in texture, alternate, ovate to ovate-lanceolate, rounded at the base, the apex mostly slenderly pointed, the margins coarsely toothed, ciliate; veins seven to twelve each side of the midrib, each one running out to the point of a marginal tooth, 1 to 212 in. long, 23 to 118 in. wide, dark dull green and harsh to the touch above, greyish beneath and downy especially on the midrib and veins; stalk very short, downy. Fruits solitary as a rule, produced from the under side of the leaf-axils, veined, very shortly stalked, roughly obovoid, 15 to 14 in. wide.

Native of central and eastern China; introduced by Wilson to the Arnold Arboretum in 1908 and to Kew in 1920, when seeds were received from Messrs Vilmorin. Although known since the last century it was originally confused with Z. serrata, to which it is indeed closely related, but has leaves with fewer lateral veins and coarser teeth. It was first described in 1916.

A plant at Kew from the introduction of 1920 measures 32 × 314 ft (1974) and there are examples of about the same size in other collections.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Kew, 30 × 312 ft, disbranched (1979); Alexandra Park, Hastings, Sussex, 50 × 5 ft at 3 ft (1983); Witham Hall, Lincs., 36 × 312 ft (1983); Edinburgh Botanic Garden, 26 × 214 + 2 ft (1985).

† Z. schneideriana Hand.-Mazz. – This species, introduced to Kew in 1979, was described in 1929 from specimens collected in Yunnan and Hunan some ten years earlier. It seems to be related to Z. sinica, but the leaves are hairy beneath on the veins, relatively broader and with apiculate teeth.


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