Zelkova serrata (Thunb.) Makino

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zelkova serrata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zelkova/zelkova-serrata/). Accessed 2020-07-05.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Corchorus serratus Thunb.
  • Corchorus hirtus Thunb., not L.
  • Ulmus keaki Sieb.
  • Planera acuminata Lindl.
  • Zelkova acuminata (Lindl.) Planch.
  • Z. keaki (Sieb.) Maxim.
  • Abelicea hirta (Thunb.) Schneid.
  • Zelkova hirta (Thunb.) Schneid.
  • Z. formosana Hayata

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zelkova serrata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zelkova/zelkova-serrata/). Accessed 2020-07-05.

A tree 100 or even 120 ft high in Japan, with a tall, smooth, grey trunk, 5 to 10 ft in diameter; young shoots at first slightly downy, soon becoming almost glabrous. Leaves ovate or ovate-lanceolate, 2 to 412 in. long, 34 to 2 in. wide, long and taper-pointed, rounded or slightly heart-shaped at the base, with six to thirteen coarse teeth at each side, each tooth with a short, slender point, dark green and furnished with short, scattered hairs above, paler and glabrous beneath; stalk 18 to 14 in. long. Flowers produced in April and May on short twigs, the males being borne two or more together at each joint of the leafless bases of the twigs, the females solitary in the axils of the leaves at the end; both small, green, and of no beauty. Fruits roundish, about 18 in. in diameter. Fading leaves often good red and orange.

Native of Japan, Formosa and probably of continental E. Asia; introduced from Japan by J. G. Veitch in 1861. Although this distinctive species is one of the most important forest trees of Japan it has not succeeded so well in this country as Z. carpinifolia. With more spreading branches than in that species it makes a less striking tree, but still elegant and interesting. In a young state it is sometimes injured by spring frost. From Z. carpinifolia it is distinguished by the taper-pointed, thinner leaves with narrower, longer-pointed teeth. It is proving susceptible to dutch elm disease.

The following examples have been recorded: Kew, 56 × 6 ft (1974); Tilgate Park, Crawley, Sussex, 60 × 634 ft (1974); Lower Sheriffs Farm, West Hoathly, Sussex, from seeds brought back from Japan in 1890, 62 × 9 ft (1976); Whitfield House, Heref., 50 × 712 ft (1973); Highnam Court, Glos., 58 × 634 ft (1970); Kilmacurragh, Co. Wicklow, Eire, 48 × 914 ft (1966).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Kew, 56 × 6 ft (1974); Tilgate Park, Sussex, 62 × 712 ft (1984); Lower Sheriff’s Farm, West Hoathly, Sussex, 62 × 914 ft (1984); Whitfield House, Heref., 42 × 814 ft, damaged by falling tree (1984); Hergest Croft, Heref., 72 × 734 ft (1985); Lower Coombe Royal, Devon, 56 × 914 ft (1977); Kilmacurragh, Co. Wicklow, Eire, 52 × 934 ft (1980).


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