Zelkova carpinifolia (Pall.) K. Koch

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zelkova carpinifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zelkova/zelkova-carpinifolia/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Rhamnus carpinifolius Pall.
  • Zelkova crenata (Michx. f.) Spach
  • Planera crenata Michx. f.
  • Zelkova ulmoides (Güldenstädt) Schneid.
  • Rhamnus ulmoides Güldenstädt
  • Abelicea ulmoides (Güldenstädt) Kuntze
  • Planera richardii Michx.

Glossary

herbarium
A collection of preserved plant specimens; also the building in which such specimens are housed.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zelkova carpinifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zelkova/zelkova-carpinifolia/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

A tree 100 ft high, with a smooth, beech-like trunk, usually comparatively short (10 to 20 ft high), dividing into a great number of erect, crowded branches; bark peeling off in flakes; young twigs very downy. Leaves 112 to 3 in. long, 34 to 134 in. wide, ovate or oval, rounded or slightly heart-shaped at the base, with seven to eleven coarse sharp teeth down each side, dark green and with scattered hairs above, paler and more downy beneath; stalk about 18 in. long. Flowers on short twigs, the males at the naked base of the twigs, the females in the leaf-axils above them. Fruits about the size of a small pea, distinctly ridged above.

Native of the Transcaucasian forests of Russia, and of bordering Iran and northeast Anatolia; introduced to France in 1760 and to Britain probably at the same time, certainly by the 1780s. This remarkable tree is undoubtedly one of the most picturesque and distinct of any that can be grown in this country. It is slow-growing and long-lived, and might well be used as a commemorative tree. The densely clustered branches, much divided at their extremities, suggest a monstrous besom. The timber is of good quality, being tough and durable.

Early this century the largest tree in the country grew at Wardour Castle in Wiltshire, but this was felled about 1936; it was about 100 ft high and had no distinct trunk, but a clustered group of more than a dozen stems (Elwes and Henry, Tr. Gt. Brit. and Irel., Vol. IV (1906), pl. 248).

At Kew there are three large specimens of this tree: in front of the Herbarium, 86 × 13 ft (1972; cf. 60 × 914 ft in 1906); behind the Herbarium, 84 × 1212 ft (1972); near the Main Gate, 77 × 1112 ft (1963). At Syon House, on the other side of the Thames from Kew, there are two old trees: 108 × 1634 ft (1976) and 87 × 1534 ft at 3 ft (1967).

Others recorded recently by Alan Mitchell are: Capel House, Enfield, Middx., 105 × 1412 ft (1976); Albury House, Surrey, 95 × 1514 ft at 2 ft (1973); Worlingham, Suff., 92 × 2114 ft at 2 ft (1968); University Parks, Oxford, 102 × 934 ft and 90 × 1412 ft (1975); Croome Court, Worcs., 82 × 23 ft at 3 ft (1964); Pitt House, Chudleigh, Devon, 82 × 1912 ft and 98 × 1914 ft (1975); Bicton, Devon, 105 × 19 ft at 3 ft (1967); National Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, Eire, 70 × 1214 ft (1974).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Kew, by Herbarium, 70 × 1334 ft (1985), behind Herbarium, 72 × 13 ft (1981) and, by Main Gate, 75 × 13 ft (1985); Syon House, London, 105 × 1734 ft and 92 × 6 ft at 3 ft (1982); Capel House, Enfield, Middx., 105 × 1412 ft (1976); Halliford Park, Sunbury, Middx., many trees, one 102 × 1434 ft (1984); Albury House, Surrey, 95 × 1514 ft at 2 ft (1973); Worlingham, Suffolk, Park Drive, 90 × 2214 ft at 3 ft (1983); Red House, 152 Valley Rd, Ipswich, 92 × 2112 ft at 4 ft, multiple stem (1981); University Parks, Oxford, 95 × 10 ft (1981) (the larger tree mentioned died in 1983); Wardour Castle, Wilts., 115 × 8 ft and 108 × 1134 ft (1977); The Rectory, Longstock, Wilts., 88 × 1612 ft (1980); Pitt House, Chudleigh, Devon, Farm, 98 × 1934 ft, part of crown dead, and, Garden, 111 × 2012 ft and 111 × 19 ft (1984); Bicton, Devon, by House, 105 × 2012 ft and, in Hermitage Walk, 108 × 1534 ft (1984); National Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, Eire, 62 × 1212 ft and 85 × 1214 ft (1980).


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