Zauschneria californica Presl

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zauschneria californica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zauschneria/zauschneria-californica/). Accessed 2020-09-23.

Genus

Synonyms

  • ?Z. mexicana Presl
  • Z. californica subsp. angustifolia Keck

Glossary

receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
indumentum
A covering of hairs or scales.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
linear
Strap-shaped.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zauschneria californica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zauschneria/zauschneria-californica/). Accessed 2020-09-23.

A subshrub to about 3 ft high. Leaves opposite to alternate, sessile, lanceolate, narrow-lanceolate, oblong or linear, 316 to 158 in. long, to about 316 in. wide, downy, sometimes densely so, on both sides, or the underside woolly, entire or distantly toothed. Flowers in terminal, bracted spikes. Receptacle scarlet, up to 158 in. long, funnel-shaped above the ovary, with spreading, triangular lobes, which are up to 12 in. long. Petals coloured like the receptacle, inserted at the mouth of the tube, deeply notched, spreading. For other characters, see generic introduction. Bot. Mag., n.s., t. 19.

Native of California and probably of Mexico; introduced in the 1840s. Clausen and his co-workers (see reference above) have shown that Z. californica, as usually understood, is a tetraploid species of hybrid origin, deriving from the two diploid species Z. cana and Z. septentrionalis (see below). Z. californica is variable, and some forms so closely approach one or other of the parents that they cannot be named with any certainty without knowledge of their chromosome-number. It is probable, however, that most of the plants cultivated as Z. californica do belong to that species, and those grown as Z. mexicana also, but there is need for further investigation. Numerous zauschnerias are or have been in commerce, differing little in colour of flower, but varying in habit, and in the relative width and the indumentum of the leaves; also – an important consideration – in flowering-time, for some forms of Z. californica produce their inflorescences so late that the flowers do not open in a dull, wet autumn.

Z. californica, in its dwarfer forms, is suitable for the rock garden, and is nearly hardy in a well-drained soil. Cuttings taken in late summer and overwintered in a frost-free house or frame will flower the following season.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

† cv. ‘Dublin’. – A very floriferous selection with flowers of a brilliant orange-red, making a fine display in late summer and autumn if massed. The original plant grew in the garden of Lady Moore at Willbrook, Co. Dublin, and was propagated by Valerie Finnis (Lady Scott). The name ‘Glasnevin’, also used for it, is incorrect (Nelson, An Irish Garden Flora (1984), pp. 155-6).


subsp. latifolia (Hook.) Keck Z.


Z cana Greene

Synonyms
Z. californica var. microphylla A. Gr.
Z. microphylla (A. Gr.) Moxley

A subshrub to about 2 ft high. Leaves grey and densely indumented, linear or almost thread-like, to {1/12} in. wide. Flowers smaller than in Z. californica, to 1{1/2} in. long. The plant that received an Award of Merit in 1928 when shown by Tom Hay as Z. microphylla was probably the true Z. cana.Z. cana is one of the diploid parents of Z. californica (see above) and is difficult to distinguish from narrow-leaved forms of that species. The other parent of Z. californicaZ. septentrionalis Keck – is herbaceous, and not treated here. It occurs in the Redwood region north of San Francisco.

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