Zanthoxylum planispinum Sieb. & Zucc.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zanthoxylum planispinum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zanthoxylum/zanthoxylum-planispinum/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Z. alatum var. planispinum (Sieb. & Zucc.) Rehd. & Wils.
  • Z. alatum f. subtrifoliolatum Franch.

Glossary

acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Zanthoxylum planispinum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/zanthoxylum/zanthoxylum-planispinum/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

A deciduous shrub up to 12 ft high, with glabrous, spiny branches; spines in pairs, thin, broad and flat at the base, 14 to 34 in. long, shining. Leaves 5 to 10 in. long, trifoliolate or pinnate, with usually three or five, rarely seven stalkless leaflets, the main-stalk distinctly winged, often 38 in. wide. Leaflets increasing in size towards the end of the leaf, the terminal one largest and as much as 5 in. long; others are only half as long; ovate or lanceolate, finely toothed, acuminate. Flowers yellowish, in small panicles 12 to 112 in. long produced from the leaf-axils in spring. Fruit red, warted; seeds black, shining, about the size of large shot. Bot. Mag., t. 8754.

Native of Japan, Korea, Formosa and China; in cultivation by the 1870s. It is easily recognised among the other hardy species by its very distinctly winged rachis and broad spines. Although deciduous, it will in mild seasons retain its leaves up to Christmas, fresh and green. After a hot summer it bears the red fruits freely, and is then very handsome. The fruiting spray depicted in the Botanical Magazine was sent by Canon Ellacombe from his garden in Gloucestershire in December 1914 and shows how the leaflets of this species roll their margins inwards during cold weather. It is almost hardy, suffering only in severe winters.


Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.