× Philageria veitchii Mast.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'× Philageria veitchii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/x-philageria/x-philageria-veitchii/). Accessed 2019-12-15.

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    hybrid
    Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    '× Philageria veitchii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/x-philageria/x-philageria-veitchii/). Accessed 2019-12-15.

    A hybrid between Lapageria rosea and Philesia magellanica which was raised by Messrs Veitch at Chelsea, and flowered in their nursery there in 1872. It was named, described, and figured that year in The GardenersChronicle, p. 358, fig. 119. The lapageria was the seed-bearer. It is a scrambling shrub with leathery, dark green, shining leaves about 112 in. long and 12 in. wide, with three prominent veins running lengthwise and converging at the apex. Flower pendulous, about 2 in. long, 12 to 34 in. wide, with a rosy purple calyx of three oblong, pointed fleshy sepals about 1 in. long; and a corolla of three bright rose-coloured overlapping petals twice as long; anthers 12 in. long, yellow; flower-stalk 14 in. long. Bot. Mag., n.s., t. 92.

    This interesting hybrid bears more resemblance to the lapageria in habit, in the stamens and in the colour of the flower, than it does to the philesia. It is hardy in Cornwall and similar places but is now very rare.

    The plate in the Botanical Magazine depicts a flowering stem from a plant growing in the cool Fern House at Kew in July 1948. If grown under glass (as it must be over much of the country) it should be planted in a border where it can remain undisturbed. Propagation is by layers.


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