Weinmannia trichosperma Cav.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Weinmannia trichosperma' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/weinmannia/weinmannia-trichosperma/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

Genus

Infraspecifics

Other species in genus

Glossary

capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Weinmannia trichosperma' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/weinmannia/weinmannia-trichosperma/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

A tree up to 100 ft high in its native forests, though usually not taller than about 40 ft; young shoots and flower-stalks furnished with brown down. Leaves opposite, pinnate, 112 to 3 in. long, composed of nine to nineteen leaflets set 14 to 12 in. apart, the space between each pair filled on each side of the main-stalk with a triangular wing. Leaflets stalkless, oval or obovate, 38 to 34 in. long, with two to six conspicuous teeth on each side, dark lustrous green and glabrous except for a few bristles at the base of each pair of leaves. Flowers fragrant, quite small, white, packed closely on a cylindrical mignonettelike raceme 112 to 2 in. long, opening in May, the stamens with their pink-tipped anthers being the most conspicuous feature. Fruit a dry, two-celled capsule, 18 in. long, red when young.

Native of the Chilean Andes in the region of Nothofagus forests, from about 35° to 45° S. This is one of the handsomest evergreens brought from Chile. Its leaves, rather fern-like in character, are distinct among evergreen species in the conspicuously winged rachis, and the white flowers, freely produced on cultivated plants, are followed by bronzy immature capsules, which in the Chilean forests give an autumnal tinge to the slopes when it occurs in large stands. It is not quite hardy near London, though it can be grown on a wall there. At Wakehurst Place in Sussex an example about 12 ft high has lived in the open for many years and flowers freely. At Tregothnan in Cornwall there is a tree measuring 59 × 334 ft (1971).


W racemosa L.f.

Synonyms
Kamahi

This is the counterpart of W. trichosperma in New Zealand, where it ranges from North Island to Stewart Island. It is probably no more tender than the Chilean species, but lacks its distinctive foliage, as the leaves of adult plants are reduced to a single leaflet and are thus in effect simple. In juvenile plants many of the leaves are divided into three leaflets, or three-lobed. It is in cultivation, but no sizeable specimen has been recorded.

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