Viburnum harryanum Rehd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Viburnum harryanum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/viburnum/viburnum-harryanum/). Accessed 2020-02-25.

Genus

Glossary

inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
mucro
Short straight point. mucronate Bearing a mucro.
orbicular
Circular.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
umbel
Inflorescence in which pedicels all arise from same point on peduncle. May be flat-topped (as in e.g. Umbelliferae) to spherical (as in e.g. Araliaceae). umbellate In form of umbel.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Viburnum harryanum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/viburnum/viburnum-harryanum/). Accessed 2020-02-25.

An evergreen shrub ultimately 6 to 8 ft high, of bushy habit, sometimes taller; young shoots clothed with a minute, dark down. Leaves orbicular to obovate or broadly ovate, tapered at the base, rounded at the apex except for a small mucro, margins entire, or with a few obscure teeth; 14 to 1 in. long, from two-thirds to nearly as wide, dark dull green above, paler beneath, quite glabrous on both surfaces; leaf-stalk about 112 in. long, reddish. Inflorescence a terminal, compound umbel, 112 in. across. Flowers pure white, 18 in. across. Fruits ovoid, pointed, e in. long, shining, black.

Native of W. China; discovered and introduced in 1904 by Wilson, who remarks that it is rare on mountains at 9,000 ft. It is quite distinct from any other cultivated evergreen viburnum in its small privet-like leaves. It appears to be fairly hardy, and flowered for the first time in cultivation in 1914. It was named in compliment to Sir Harry Veitch.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This species is figured in Bot. Mag., n.s., t.875.


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