Vaccinium canadense Richards.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Vaccinium canadense' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/vaccinium/vaccinium-canadense/). Accessed 2020-07-04.

Genus

Common Names

  • Sour-top
  • Velvet Leaf

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Vaccinium canadense' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/vaccinium/vaccinium-canadense/). Accessed 2020-07-04.

A low, much-branched deciduous shrub usually under 1 ft high; shoots very downy, even bristly. Leaves 34 to 112 in. long, 18 to 12 in. wide, narrowly oval, pointed, not toothed, downy on both sides. Flowers produced during May along with the young leaves in short dense clusters. Corolla bell-shaped, 14 in. or less long, white tinged with red. Berries blue-black, 14 in. or more wide, very agreeably flavoured. Bot. Mag., t. 3446.

Native of eastern N. America; introduced in 1834. It has been much confused in gardens with the various forms of V. angustifolium, but is readily distinguished by its very downy entire leaves. Like that species, it gives a valuable wild fruit, its berries ripening later, and forming a useful succession to the other in N. America.

It is a matter of controversy whether this is the species described by Michaux as V. myrtilloides. Some authorities have adopted this name (1803) and reduced V. canadense Richards. (1823) to synonymy under it. Others hold that V. myrtilloides was simply a downy variety of V. angustifolium, var. myrtilloides (Michx.) House.


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