Ulmus serotina Sarg.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ulmus serotina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ulmus/ulmus-serotina/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

Genus

Common Names

  • Red or September Elm

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
perianth
Calyx and corolla. Term used especially when petals and sepals are not easily distinguished from each other.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ulmus serotina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ulmus/ulmus-serotina/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

A tree 60 to 70 ft high of spreading habit, with slender, glabrous or nearly glabrous young shoots, often becoming more or less corky-winged. Leaves oblong, often inclined to obovate, 2 to 312 in. long, slender-pointed, very unequal at the base, doubly toothed, with about twenty pairs of veins, glabrous and glossy above, downy on the veins beneath; stalks about 14 in. long. Flowers in pendulous racemes 114 in. long, opening in September. Samaras 12 in. long, oblong-elliptical, deeply divided at the apex, fringed along the margins with silvery white hairs; they are ripe in November.

A native of the USA, where it is rare and local in Georgia and Alabama, north to south Kentucky and south Illinois, usually on limestone. From the other autumn-flowering American species, U. crassifolia, it differs in its racemose inflorescence and in having the perianth divided to the base. It has been planted to some extent as a shade-tree in Georgia and Alabama, but is of no economic importance.


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