Trochodendron aralioides Sieb. & Zucc.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Trochodendron aralioides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/trochodendron/trochodendron-aralioides/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    bloom
    Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    lanceolate
    Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
    lustrous
    Smooth and shiny.

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Trochodendron aralioides' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/trochodendron/trochodendron-aralioides/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

    An evergreen glabrous tree attaining a height of 60 to 80 ft in Japan. Leaves 3 to 5 in. long, narrowly oval or lanceolate, leathery, shallowly toothed at the upper end, lustrous green; leaf-stalks half the length of the blade. Flowers produced from April to June in erect, terminal racemes, each flower on a slender stalk 1 to 112 in. long. There are no sepals or petals, and the numerous stamens are set round the edge of a green hemispherical disk, which is really the calyx-tube. Across the stamens the flower is 34 in. in diameter. Carpels about ten, arranged in a ring within the stamens. Bot. Mag., t. 7375.

    Native of Japan from N. Honshu southwards, the Ryukyus and Formosa; also of Korea on Quelpaert Island (Cheju Do). It is a shrub or small tree in Britain, quite hardy if sheltered from cold winds, with handsome foliage recalling that of a tree-ivy. It is interesting when in bloom, the flowers being a vivid green. It was introduced from Japan by Messrs Veitch, in whose nursery at Coombe Wood it first flowered in 1894. It will grow in any good soil that is not excessively chalky.

    Examples of this tree, which deserves to be more widely planted, are: East Bergholt Place, Suffolk, 30 × 234 ft at 2 ft (1972); Embley Park, Hants, 25 × 112 ft (1971); Exbury, Hants, 25 × 114 ft (1970); Westonbirt, Glos., 26 × 2 ft (1971); Caerhays, Cornwall, 25 × 214 ft (1971).

    From the Supplement (Vol. V)

    The specimens at East Bergholt, Embley and Exbury have not been remeasured since the stated dates. Some others are: Westonbirt, Glos., 31 × 214 ft (1977); South Lodge, Sussex, 26 × 334 + 312 ft at 3 ft (1985); Caerhays, Cornwall, 33 × 212 + 2 ft (1984); Bodnant, Gwyn., 38 × 214 ft (1981); Crathes Castle, Banchory, Kinc., 20 × 314 ft at 3 ft (1981).


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