Tripterygium regelii Sprague & Takeda

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Tripterygium regelii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/tripterygium/tripterygium-regelii/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

Genus

Synonyms

  • T. wilfordii sens . Reg., not Hook. f.

Other species in genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Tripterygium regelii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/tripterygium/tripterygium-regelii/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

A deciduous shrub of rambling or climbing habit, with angular, warted stems. Leaves alternate, oval or ovate, broadly wedge-shaped to rounded at the base, tapered at the apex to a long and slender point, 212 to 6 in. long, 112 to 4 in. wide, the margin set with rounded, blunt, incurved teeth, dark green above, and except for minute down on the midrib when quite young; stalk 14 to 34 in. long. Flowers yellowish white, about 13 in. wide, produced in a panicle at the end of the shoot, supplemented by clusters in the axils of the terminal leaves, the whole forming an inflorescence up to 8 or 9 in. long and 2 or 3 in. wide, petals five, roundish obovate; calyx small, with five rounded lobes; stamens five. Fruits three-angled, each angle conspicuously winged; the wings erect, about 58 in. long, 14 in. wide, membranous. The whole inflorescence is covered with short brown felt.

Native of the main and southern islands of Japan, and of Korea and Manchuria; introduced to the Arnold Arboretum by J. G. Jack in 1905 and thence to Kew. It is hardy, but not so fine a species as T. wilfordii. The fruits are greenish and rather like those of a wych elm with an extra wing.


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