Tilia × haynaldiana Simonkai

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Credits

Owen Johnson & Julian Sutton (2020)

Recommended citation
Johnson, O. & Sutton, J. (2020), 'Tilia × haynaldiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/tilia/tilia-x-haynaldiana/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Glossary

dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.
karst
Landscape area formed by the dissolution of limestone by water with much exposed rock. Karst areas are usually rather arid due to the free-draining conditions.

References

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Credits

Owen Johnson & Julian Sutton (2020)

Recommended citation
Johnson, O. & Sutton, J. (2020), 'Tilia × haynaldiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/tilia/tilia-x-haynaldiana/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

A hybrid, intermediate in features between its parents T. platyphyllos and T. tomentosa.

Distribution  Montenegro and other parts of SE Europe where the parents grow together

Habitat Woodlands

USDA Hardiness Zone 5

RHS Hardiness Rating H6

Tilia × haynaldiana was described by Simonkai in 1887 to describe natural hybrids between Tilia platyphyllos (Broad-leaved Lime) and T. tomentosa (Silver Lime), which occur rarely in parts of Europe where both species grow together, though the much later flowering of the Silver Lime would generally pose a barrier to cross-fertilisation (Pigott 2012). One such tree was recorded by Donald Pigott in 1986, in a wooded doline on karst near Kolasin in Montenegro (Pigott 2012). Cultivated specimens of T. × juranyana (often labelled T. tomentosa f. virescens) look very similar.

A tree labelled Tilia × haynaldiana in the late Maurice Mason’s garden at Beachamwell, Norfolk, was 14 m, dbh 53 cm in 2009; there are younger trees at Wakehurst Place and the Sir Harold Hillier Gardens, Hampshire. Also at the the Hillier Gardens are two trees catalogued as hybrids of Tilia platyphyllos with T. tomentosa ‘Orbicularis’. The larger was 17 m, dbh 44 cm in 2017 (Tree Register 2018).


'Mrs Stensson'

A narrow tree with leaves grey-felted underneath. Named in Canada and sold after 1965 by the Sheridan Nurseries, Ontario, it is of Polish origin. It appears to be a cross that occurred in the Warsaw Botanic Garden soon after 1900, which has sometimes been sometimes grown as Tilia × varsoviensis Kobenza in Europe. Some authorities consider it to be a cultivar of T. tomentosa (Jablonski & Plietzsch 2014). The name honours the landscape architect Janina Stensson (Wyman 1966). There is an example, planted in 1971, in the University of Guelph Arboretum, Canada (University of Guelph 2020).

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