Therorhodion camtschaticum (Pall.) Small

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Therorhodion camtschaticum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/therorhodion/therorhodion-camtschaticum/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Rhododendron camtschaticum Pall.

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    glandular
    Bearing glands.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Therorhodion camtschaticum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/therorhodion/therorhodion-camtschaticum/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

    A deciduous shrub growing in low dense tufts 4 to 10 in. high, producing its flowers on stems up to 6 in. high. It spreads by means of underground suckers. Young shoots furnished with scattered bristles. Leaves stalkless, obovate, 34 to 2 in. long, 13 to 34 in. wide, thin in texture, glabrous above, slightly bristly beneath, and conspicuously so on the margin. Flowers solitary or in pairs (rarely in threes) on an erect, slender, glandular-bristly stem, the lateral flower or flowers produced on stalks 34 to 112 in. long; corolla 112 to 134 in. across, rosy crimson, with five open, spreading, oblong lobes, the three upper ones spotted. Calyx green, 1 in. across, the lobes narrowly oblong, bristly; stamens ten, very downy at the bottom. Bot. Mag., t. 8210.

    Native of Japan in Hokkaido (and of one locality in Honshu), thence north through Sakhalin and the Kuriles to the Aleutians and W. Alaska; also on the mainland of Russia from the Ussuri region to Kamchatka; introduced to Britain a few years before 1802. This remarkable and pretty species thrives and flowers well on the rock garden at Edinburgh, but is difficult to suit in southern England, where, for no obvious reason, it succeeds in one garden and fails in another. It needs a light, acid, humus-rich soil, but special mixtures are unlikely to help; it is unsuitable for gardens with poor air drainage, where the expanding flower-shoots may be killed by late frost. Beyond that, no useful advice can be given, except that it should not be coddled.


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