Teucrium fruticans L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Teucrium fruticans' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/teucrium/teucrium-fruticans/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

Genus

Common Names

  • Shrubby Germander

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
flush
Coordinated growth of leaves or flowers. Such new growth is often a different colour to mature foliage.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Teucrium fruticans' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/teucrium/teucrium-fruticans/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

An evergreen shrub of diffuse habit, naturally 7 or 8 ft high, stems square, and covered with a close white felt. Leaves opposite, ovate, 12 to 112 in. long, about half as wide, broadly wedge-shaped or rounded at the base, bluntish at the apex; dark, rather bright green and glabrous above, white, with a close felt beneath, fragrant when crushed; stalk 14 in. or less long. Flowers produced during the summer and sometimes in autumn singly in the axils of the small uppermost leaves or bracts – the whole forming a raceme 3 or 4 in. long. Calyx 14 in. long, with five ovate, pointed, leaf-like lobes, white beneath. Corolla pale purple or lavender-coloured, forming a short tube at the base, to which the four long stamens are attached, then developing into a large five-lobed lip 1 in. long (like the lip of an orchid flower in shape), the basal pair of lobes the smallest and palest; flower-stalk white, 14 in. or less long.

Native of Portugal, the W. Mediterranean region and the Adriatic; introduced early in the 18th century. It is very pretty, and its curiously shaped labiate flower makes it one of the most easily recognised of shrubs. It can be grown in the open in the milder parts, but elsewhere it needs the protection of a wall and is hardiest in a light, well-drained soil. Easily increased in summer by cuttings of half-ripened wood. It needs no regular pruning apart from a light trimming after the main flush of flowers is over and the removal of winter-killed wood in spring.


'Azureum'

Flowers darker blue than in the form usually cultivated. Introduced by Collingwood Ingram from the High Atlas of Morocco. A.M. May 16, 1936. Capt. Ingram also gave cuttings to friends in the South of France, where it makes a wonderful display. But in this country it is definitely tender and needs a very warm corner.

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