Tetracentron sinense Oliver

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Tetracentron sinense' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/tetracentron/tetracentron-sinense/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

Genus

Infraspecifics

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    inflorescence
    Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
    Tibet
    Traditional English name for the formerly independent state known to its people as Bod now the Tibet (Xizang) Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The name Xizang is used in lists of Chinese provinces.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
    spike
    Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Tetracentron sinense' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/tetracentron/tetracentron-sinense/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

    A deciduous tree 50 to 90 ft high in the wild; young branches dark, glabrous. Leaves, except on extension growths, borne singly below the apex of slow-growing and long-lived spurs, each year’s growth marked by the scar left by the fallen leaf. The leaves are ovate or heart-shaped, long-pointed, with five or seven prominent nerves radiating from the base, 3 to 412 in. long, 2 in. wide, the margins evenly set with blunt teeth. Inflorescence a pendulous, catkin-like spike springing from the end of a spur and bearing numerous very small yellowish flowers. See further in generic introduction.

    A native of central and western China, upper Burma, S.E. Tibet and (var. himalense) of the Himalaya as far west as E. Nepal; discovered by Augustine Henry in Hupeh; described in 1889 and introduced by Wilson in 1901 when collecting for Messrs Veitch. Like its cousin Trochodendron aralioides, it is more than just a botanical curiosity, being handsome in foliage and a picture of great elegance and beauty when bearing its slender catkins around midsummer. It is much hardier and less demanding than was once supposed. The largest example grows at Caerhays in Cornwall and measures 40 ft in height, with several stems, the stoutest 414 ft in girth (1975). But the other sizeable specimens are well distributed: The High Beeches, Handcross, Sussex, 39 × 212 ft (1974); University Botanic Garden, Cambridge, 37 × 234 ft + 2 ft (1976); Edinburgh Botanic Garden, pl. 1905, 30 × 314 ft (1970).

    From the Supplement (Vol. V)

    specimens: Nymans, Sussex, Magnolia Garden, 52 × 414 ft at 2 ft (1985); The High Beeches, Handcross, Sussex, 35 × 212 ft at 3 ft (1982); University Botanic Garden, Cambridge, 42 × 3 + 214 ft (1982); Caerhays, Cornwall, 50 × 412 ft + 414 ft + 312 ft (1984); Edinburgh Botanic Garden, pl. 1905, 36 × 414 ft (1985).


    var. himalense Hara & Kanai

    It was believed until recently that T. sinense had its western limit in upper Burma. But in 1963 the Japanese botanical expedition to E. Nepal discovered there a tetracentron that differs from T. sinense only in the mostly rather larger, longer-tipped leaves, with finer tips, and the laxer fruiting catkins. It is possible that this variety extends into upper Burma and Yunnan (Hara in Fl. East. Himalaya (1966), pp. 85-6). The variety was again found in 1967 by the Japanese expedition to Bhutan and is also now known to occur in the Assam Himalaya.

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