Syringa × persica L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa × persica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-x-persica/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Common Names

  • Persian Lilac

Synonyms

  • S. ?afghanica × S. laciniata

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa × persica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-x-persica/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

A deciduous shrub, 4 to 6 ft high, of dense, bushy, rounded habit; young shoots slender, glabrous. Leaves lance-shaped or ovate lance-shaped (rarely three-lobed), with a long tapering apex and a more abruptly tapered base, green and glabrous on both sides, 1 to 212 in. long, 13 to 12 in. wide; stalk 13 in. long. Flowers of the common lilac shade and fragrance, produced in May from the uppermost buds of the preceding summer’s growth in small, sometimes branching panicles, 2 to 3 in. long and as much wide. Corolla-tube about 14 in. long, the four spreading lobes rather shorter. Calyx funnel-shaped with four short, pointed lobes. Seed-vessels 12 in. long, cylindrical. Series Syringa. Bot. Mag., t. 486.

A hybrid of unproved but ancient origin, which has been cultivated from time immemorial in Persia and India and had reached Europe by the early 17th century. It has been suggested that one of its parents may be the rare and little known S. afghanica Schneid., only known from a few collections in the wild and not yet introduced to cultivation.

The Persian lilac is a delightful shrub, both in its neat habit and its fragrant blossom. There is also a white-flowered form of it, cv. ‘Alba’, in cultivation since the 18th century. Both are increased by cuttings of nearly ripe wood.

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