Syringa pubescens Turcz.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa pubescens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-pubescens/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Synonyms

  • S. villosa sens. Bot. Mag ., t. 7064, not Vahl

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa pubescens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-pubescens/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

A deciduous shrub or small tree, 12 to 15 ft high, forming a rounded head of branches; young shoots glabrous. Leaves 1 to 212 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, broadly ovate, sometimes roundish, tapered abruptly at the apex to a short point, rounded or broadly wedge-shaped at the base, dull green and glabrous above, pale and with a little scattered down beneath, most abundant on the midrib; stalk 14 to 12 in. long. Flowers fragrant, pale lilac or nearly white, produced along with the young leaves during early May in leafless panicles from one or both of the terminal buds of last year’s shoots. The panicles are 3 to 5 in. long, 2 to 3 in. wide, the corolla-tube slender, 12 in. long; lobes 18 in. long, the incurving of the margins making them cupped. Calyx very short, with triangular lobes. Series Pubescentes. Bot. Mag., t. 7064.

Native of N. China; introduced by Dr Bretschneider in 1881. It is only a second-rate lilac in this country, owing to the frequent injury of the young growths and panicles by late frost. In the United States, where the summer heat is greater, and the seasons better defined, it is very beautiful. The confusion in the naming of this shrub and S. villosa is alluded to under that species.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.