Syringa potaninii Schneid.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa potaninii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-potaninii/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
truncate
Appearing as if cut off.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa potaninii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-potaninii/). Accessed 2020-10-27.

A deciduous shrub of graceful habit ultimately 9 to 12 ft high; young shoots minutely downy. Leaves mostly oval, slenderly pointed, tapered at the base, 112 to 3 in. long, 34 to 112 in. wide, dark green and minutely but densely downy above, thickly covered with soft down beneath; stalk 18 to 14 in. long. Inflorescence loosely pyramidal, erect, 3 to 6 in. long, 2 to 3 in. wide; main and secondary flower-stalks downy. Flowers fragrant, 13 to 12 in. long, white to pale rosy purple, the tube very slender, the four lobes 18 in. long, narrowly oblong; anthers yellow. Calyx downy, cup-shaped, shallowly toothed or nearly truncate. Seed-vessel 58 in. long, pointed, glossy, smooth or minutely and sparsely warted. Flowers in June. Series Pubescentes. Bot. Mag., t. 9060.

Native of W. China; discovered in Kansu in 1885 by the Russian traveller Potanin. Wilson found it in 1904 and again in 1908 near Kangting (Tatsien-lu) in W. Szechwan, but apparently it did not reach Britain until Farrer sent seeds from S. Kansu in 1914. A beautiful form from this sending, raised at Highdown, near Worthing, by the late Sir Frederick Stern, is portrayed in the Botanical Magazine. The flowers of the Highdown plant are almost pure white, delightfully fragrant, with yellow anthers. This species is related to S. julianae, but that species has smaller leaves, dark violet anthers and a glabrous calyx. Nearly related to these two species is:

S. pinetorum W.W. Sm. – According to Forrest, who collected it in June 1914, in the Lichiang range of Yunnan, this is a shrub 4 to 8 ft high with pale lavender-rose flowers. They have yellow anthers, and the leaves, 1 to 112 in. long, are hairy on the midrib and veins beneath. Forrest introduced it, but it is uncertain if the true species is now in cultivation (1979).

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