Syringa pinnatifolia Hemsl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa pinnatifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-pinnatifolia/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa pinnatifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-pinnatifolia/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

A deciduous shrub, 8 to 12 ft high, of elegant bushy habit, the young shoots and every other part of the plant free from down. Leaves pinnate, 112 to 312 in. long, composed of seven, nine, or eleven leaflets, which are dull green, stalkless, ovate-lanceolate, 34 to 114 in. long, 14 to 38 in. wide, pointed, the base rounded or in the case of the terminal leaflets frequently attached to the common stalk by a portion of the blade. Flowers white, with a slight lilac tint, produced in late April or early May in panicles 112 to 3 in. long, which spring usually in opposite pairs from the joints of the previous year’s wood. Corolla-tube 12 in. long, the lobes at the mouth spreading and giving the flower a diameter of 14 in.; calyx-lobes rounded.

Native of W. China; discovered by Wilson in 1904 in W. Szechwan, where it grows at altitudes of 7-9,000 ft. The pinnate leaves of this species at once suggest an affinity with S. laciniata, but they are divided (except sometimes near the apex) into quite distinct leaflets, and not merely lobed as in the other. It has been placed by Rehder in a series of its own, ser. Pinnatifoliae. It has interest as a distinct and hardy lilac, but its garden value is not equal to that of S. laciniata or S. × persica. It is one parent of S. × diversifolia (see under S. oblata).

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