Syringa meyeri Schneid.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa meyeri' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-meyeri/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
article
(in Casuarinaceae) Portion of branchlet between each whorl of leaves.
clone
Organism arising via vegetative or asexual reproduction.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa meyeri' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-meyeri/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

This lilac was introduced by F. N. Meyer from Chihli, N. China, in 1908 to the United States Dept. of Agriculture by means of cuttings. It is a deciduous shrub of dense, compact habit growing up to 5 or 6 ft high, with slightly downy, squarish young shoots. Leaves oval, sometimes inclined to obovate, 34 to 134 in. long, not quite so wide, glabrous except occasionally for down on the veins beneath. Two pairs of veins run from the base of the leaf to the apex parallel with the margins. The violet-purple flowers are produced in May and June, densely packed in panicles up to 4 in. long and 212 in. wide. Corolla 12 in. long, with spreading lobes giving it a diameter of over 14 in. Calyx and flower-stalks either glabrous or slightly downy. Seed-vessel 12 to 34 in. long, warted. Series Pubescentes.

Meyer’s lilac is only known as a cultivated plant in N. China. It is most closely related to S. pubescens, whose leaves are not generally so tapered at the base, more downy beneath, and have three or more pairs of veins. Mrs McKelvey considered that it may eventually prove to be a selected form of that species.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

cv. ‘Palibin. – The reference-plant of this clone grows on the Rock Garden at Kew. In about 1978, it was then thirty years old and only 4 ft high and 612 ft across (Peter Green, Bot. Mag., n.s., t.778). In this article Mr Green remarks that ‘Palibin’ is almost certainly the ‘new Corean lilac’ sold by Japanese nurseries under the erroneous name ’S. palibiniana’. It is of course possible that two or more slightly differing clones were sent out.


'Palibin'

A dwarf, slow-growing, compact selection of S. meyeri, which has become very popular as a rock garden shrub. It was introduced under the incorrect name of S. palibiniana and more recently has been listed as S. velutina. Both these names are properly synonyms of S. patula (q.v.). This lilac has been given the clonal name ‘Palibin’ (Bot. Mag., n.s., t. 778).

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