Syringa julianae Schneid.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa julianae' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-julianae/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Syringa julianae' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/syringa/syringa-julianae/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

A deciduous spreading shrub of stiff, bushy habit, about 6 ft high; young shoots slender, very downy, the down persisting for two years. Leaves 1 to 2 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide, oval (sometimes inclined to ovate or obovate), tapered at the base, finely pointed, dull dark green, with appressed hairs above; grey and very hairy beneath; stalk 16 to 13 in. long, hairy. Panicles 2 to 4 in. long, usually in pairs from the terminal buds of the previous year’s shoots, sometimes from the two or three uppermost pairs, hairy like the shoots. Flowers fragrant, 14 to 13 in. long, 18 to 16 in. across the lobes. Calyx violet-coloured, glabrous, with short pointed lobes. The hairy flower-stalks (about 18 in. long) carry one to three blossoms. Corolla deep lilac outside, pale inside the lobes. Series Pubescentes. Bot. Mag., t. 8423.

Native of W. China; introduced by Wilson for Messrs Veitch about 1900. It is allied to S. pubescens and S. patula, but is more downy than the first and its flowers are more deeply coloured. The second species has a downy calyx. S. julianae flowers in May and June, and is both distinct and pretty, but not equal to the best lilacs.

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