Sycopsis sinensis Oliver

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sycopsis sinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sycopsis/sycopsis-sinensis/). Accessed 2020-01-26.

Genus

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    capsule
    Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
    entire
    With an unbroken margin.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    inflorescence
    Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
    lanceolate
    Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Sycopsis sinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sycopsis/sycopsis-sinensis/). Accessed 2020-01-26.

    An evergreen bushy shrub or a small tree, up to 20 ft high in China; young shoots at first scaly. Leaves rather leathery, strongly nerved, entire or slightly toothed towards the apex, ovate or ovate-lanceolate, 2 to 412 in. long, one-third to half as wide, glabrous and dark green above, paler and quite glabrous beneath; leaf-stalk and young wood slightly warted. Flowers in short dense clusters less than 1 in. long, the chief features of which are the six to ten stamens and the reddish brown bracts that enclose the inflorescence. Anthers yellow, tinged with orange. Fruit a dry, woolly, egg-shaped capsule, 13 in. long. Bot. Mag., n.s., t. 655.

    Native of Central China; introduced by Wilson for Messrs Veitch in 1901. It is perfectly hardy at Kew, and can be increased by means of cuttings made of fairly ripened wood and placed in heat. Its neat habit and distinct appearance, combined with its evergreen nature, make it welcome in gardens, and when well flowered it is quite handsome. It blossoms usually in March, sometimes in February.

    S. tutcheri Hemsl. – So far as is known, this species is not in cultivation. Plants distributed under the name S. tutcheri derive from one at Kew, originally so labelled, which appears to be no species of Sycopsis but a form or relative of Distylium racemosum.


    Feedback

    A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

    For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

    To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.