Stranvaesia nussia (D. Don) Decne.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Stranvaesia nussia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/stranvaesia/stranvaesia-nussia/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Pyrus nussia D. Don
  • Stranvaesia glaucescens Lindl.
  • Photinia nussia (D. Don) Kalkmann

Other species in genus

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Stranvaesia nussia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/stranvaesia/stranvaesia-nussia/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

A small evergreen tree, the branchlets covered when young with a loose, whitish down, ultimately glabrous. Leaves leathery, lanceolate to obovate, 212 to 4 in. long, 34 to 2 in. wide, dark shining green and glabrous above, paler, glossy and slightly downy on the midrib beneath, finely toothed. Flowers white, about 12 in. across, produced in July in flattish, terminal, hairy-stalked corymbs 2 to 4 in. across; flower-stalk and receptacle woolly. Fruits hoary with down when young, becoming pale red and glabrous, 14 in. long, pear-shaped.

Including its varieties, not treated here, S. nussia is of wide distribution from the central and eastern Himalaya to S. China, the Indonesian region and the Philippines; it was introduced from the Himalaya in 1828. It is not reliably hardy near London unless grown on a wall, but flowers and fruits in the open ground in the milder parts and attained a height of 20 ft at Binstead in the Isle of Wight.

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