Spiraea veitchii Hemsl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Spiraea veitchii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/spiraea/spiraea-veitchii/). Accessed 2020-01-19.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Spiraea veitchii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/spiraea/spiraea-veitchii/). Accessed 2020-01-19.

A strong-growing shrub, 10 or 12 ft high eventually, producing gracefully arching shoots, 2 to 3 ft long in a season; young branches reddish, slightly downy. Leaves 34 to 2 in. long, 13 to 34 in. wide, oblong or obovate, not toothed, glabrous on both surfaces or very slightly downy beneath. Flowers white, small, crowded in dense corymbs, 112 to 212 in. across. Calyx and flower-stalks covered with a fine down. Fruits glabrous when ripe. Bot. Mag., t. 8383.

Native of western and central China; discovered by Wilson in W. Hupeh in 1900, and introduced by him for Messrs Veitch. It is a fine species (Mr Wilson told me he considered it the best of Chinese spiraeas), somewhat similar in general aspect and in producing its flowers on short leafy twigs from the growths of the previous summer, to the well-known S. canescens. It is readily distinguished from that species, however, by its glabrous, entire leaves and glabrous fruit. Its entire leaves also distinguish it from two other allies – S. henryi and S. wilsonii. I saw the plants first introduced in their young state in the Coombe Wood nursery, when they were making shoots as much as 8 ft long in a season; when these, the following June, were wreathed from end to end with clusters of pure white blossom, they made a picture of remarkable beauty.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

† S. schneideriana Rehd. – Allied to S. veitchii, but branches angled in their second year, leaves smaller (to about 12 in. long), glabrous except at the margin, and inflorescence less compound. Described from a flowering specimen collected by Wilson in western Swechuan, but apparently not introduced until Roy Lancaster brought home seeds from the Minya Konka area of western Szechwan (L.927). This introduction is referred to var. amphidoxa Rehd., also described from Wilson specimens and differing from the type in minor characters.


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