Spiraea trilobata L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Spiraea trilobata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/spiraea/spiraea-trilobata/). Accessed 2020-02-26.

Genus

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
umbel
Inflorescence in which pedicels all arise from same point on peduncle. May be flat-topped (as in e.g. Umbelliferae) to spherical (as in e.g. Araliaceae). umbellate In form of umbel.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Spiraea trilobata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/spiraea/spiraea-trilobata/). Accessed 2020-02-26.

A twiggy shrub, 3 to 4 ft high, of broad but compact habit, young shoots and leaves glabrous; stems round, often zigzagged in growth. Leaves roundish, 12 to 1 in. (rarely 112 in.) long, and about as much wide, coarsely toothed, sometimes obscurely three- or five-lobed, the base rounded or sometimes slightly heart-shaped, rather glaucous green. Flowers white, small, produced during June, packed very numerously in umbels 34 to 112 in. across; each umbel terminating a short leafy twig, springing from the previous year’s growth, every flower having a slender, glabrous stalk 13 to 34 in. long.

Native of N. Asia, from Korea and N. China to Siberia and Turkestan; introduced in 1801. Although its flower-buds are sometimes injured by frosts, this is a very pretty shrub of neat habit.

S. blumei G. Don S. chamaedryfolia sens. Bl., not L. – A native of Korea and Japan, this is nearly allied to S. trilobata, but differs in the shape of the leaf, which is ovate or lozenge-shaped, longer than it is wide, the base wedge-shaped. Flowers white, crowded in umbels 1 in. wide. A shrub 3 to 6 ft high.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

S. blumei – This species also occurs in China, and is in cultivation from seeds collected by Stephen Haw in Shantung province in 1981. It was also seen by Roy Lancaster in the Wudang Shan, north-west Hupeh, in 1983.


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