Sorbus tianschanica Rupr.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbus tianschanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbus/sorbus-tianschanica/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Pyrus tianschanica (Rupr.) Franch.

Glossary

inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
acute
Sharply pointed.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
lax
Loose or open.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
rachis
Central axis of an inflorescence cone or pinnate leaf.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbus tianschanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbus/sorbus-tianschanica/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

A tree to about 25 ft high in the wild, or a shrub; branchlets glabrous or almost so, olive-brown or reddish brown, purplish brown in the second season; winter buds about 38 in. long, narrowly conical, acute, the scales white-hairy on the back or only at the edge. Leaves 4 to 6 in. long including petiole; rachis glabrous, or sometimes with woolly tufts at the insertions of the leaflets, which are in five to seven pairs, lanceolate, 112 to 2 in. long, 38 to 58 in. wide, tapered to an acute apex, toothed in the upper half or two-thirds, almost glabrous beneath when mature. Inflorescence lax, 4 to 6 in. wide, more or less glabrous. Flowers white or sometimes tinged with pink, unusually large, about 58 in. wide on the introduced plants and apparently even wider on some wild plants; receptacle glabrous. Carpels free almost to the base. Fruits globose, about 38 in. wide, glabrous. Bot. Mag., t.7755.

Native mainly of Soviet Central Asia, but extending southwest into Afghanistan, northwest Pakistan and the inner parts of Kashmir, and eastward as far as the Chinese province of Kansu; introduced from Russia in 1895. So far, this species has not been a success in this country, though with so wide a range in Asia it may yet provide a form adapted to our climate. A plant that once grew at Borde Hill in Sussex, planted in 1907, had not produced a fruit by 1932, when it was 5 ft high. Dr Fox’s plant in the Winkworth Arboretum grew to be 9 ft high in nineteen years and in that time flowered once, without bearing fruits. In Scotland it succeeds better.

For a species supposedly related to S. tianschanica, see S. cashmiriana,

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