Sorbus gracilis (Sieb. & Zucc.) K. Koch

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbus gracilis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbus/sorbus-gracilis/). Accessed 2020-02-23.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Pyrus gracilis Sieb. & Zucc.
  • S. schwerinii Schneid.

Glossary

inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
ellipsoid
An elliptic solid.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
orbicular
Circular.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbus gracilis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbus/sorbus-gracilis/). Accessed 2020-02-23.

A small, deciduous tree or shrub of compact, bushy habit, up to 12 ft, young shoots slender, downy. Leaves pinnate, with a main-stalk 3 to 6 in. long, carrying three to five pairs of leaflets which are roundish oblong to oblong, 1 to 212 in. long, toothed towards the rounded or pointed apex, slightly downy and pale beneath. Inflorescence few-flowered, 1 to 2 in. across, with persistent, green, fan-shaped stipules, which are toothed at the apex and about 78 in. wide. Flowers cream-coloured, opening in late May, about 14 in. wide, with orbicular petals. Fruits erect, about 34 in. long, yellowish red, pear-shaped in cultivated plants but usually globose or ellipsoid in the wild.

A native of the mountains of Japan, not introduced until the 1930s. It is a distinct and attractive species, the foliage being bronzy green at first, changing to rich red in the autumn. This character, combined with its relatively small size and slow growth, render it well adapted for small gardens. Out of flower it could be taken for a rose, and the likeness is greatest in autumn, when the scattered fruits stand out above the foliage like rose heps. A plant in Dr Fox’s collection was 12 ft high and 7 ft in spread when eighteen years planted, but there are older plants in gardens only 8 ft high.


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