Sorbus coxii McAll.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Sorbus coxii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbus/sorbus-coxii/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

Genus

Glossary

family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
microspecies
Species distinguished on the basis of minute differences of morphology. Generally used only for species that reproduce via apomixis (e.g. Sorbus).
section
(sect.) Subdivision of a genus.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Sorbus coxii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbus/sorbus-coxii/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

Tree probably to 10–15 m. Leaves to 13 cm long, with five to eight pairs of similarly sized leaflets. Leaflet margins dentate on upper half on spur shoots. Fruit white flushed with crimson, 0.8–0.9 × 0.8–0.95 cm; carpels (three to) four to five. Tetraploid apomict (2n = 68). McAllister 2005a. Distribution CHINA: Yunnan (east flank of the Lijiang range). Habitat Presumably mountain woodland or scrub. USDA Hardiness Zone 6 (?) Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration NT25.

Sorbus coxii was named in honour of the Cox family of Glendoick, Perthshire, well known for their hereditary interests in rhododendrons and plant-hunting, and in whose gardens at Glendoick this microspecies was first recognised (by Hugh Mc-Allister in 1998), in the form of two trees presumably originally grown from Forrest 5550, collected in 1910. Sorbus coxii is also in section Discolores, and is similar to S. pseudohupehensis, though the foliage is more green and the leaflets are all of similar sizes. It is also close to S. muliensis (Forrest 22177), and McAllister (2005a) compares the two in tabular form. His conclusion is that they are distinct, but very similar, apomictic microspecies.

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