Sorbus chamaemespilus (L.) Crantz

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbus chamaemespilus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbus/sorbus-chamaemespilus/). Accessed 2020-02-23.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Mespilus chamaemespilus L.
  • Crataegus alpina Mill.
  • Pyrus chamaemespilus (L.) Ehrh.

Glossary

receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
corymb
Unbranched inflorescence with lateral flowers the pedicels of which are of different lengths making the inflorescence appear flat-topped.
endemic
(of a plant or an animal) Found in a native state only within a defined region or country.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
section
(sect.) Subdivision of a genus.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbus chamaemespilus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbus/sorbus-chamaemespilus/). Accessed 2020-02-23.

A shrub of dwarf, compact habit, becoming eventually 5 or 6 ft high; branches short, stiff; young twigs covered at first with a whitish, cobweb-like substance. Leaves 114 to 3 in. long, 58 to 112 in. wide, ovate, oval or slightly obovate, green and glabrous on both surfaces, apex rounded or pointed, margins finely toothed; stalk 18 to 13 in. long. Flowers rosy, crowded in umbels which together form a small terminal corymb. Receptacle woolly at the base like the flower-stalk, the teeth pointed, erect, almost glabrous outside, but covered with a thick white wool inside; petals erect, never spreading. Fruits 13 to 12 in. long, scarcely so wide, scarlet-red.

Native of the mountains of central and southern Europe, to which it is endemic; in cultivation 1683. It is not frequent in gardens, but is very ornamental when in fruit and well worth growing as one of the few truly shrubby species, especially for planting in some sunny spot where a slow-growing shrub is desirable. It is distinct from the Aria group in its quite glabrous leaves and upright petals, and is now usually placed in a separate section of Sorbus, of which it is the sole member.

Although usually very dwarf in the wild, S. chamaemespilus is said to have attained a height of 12 ft in a garden in Perthshire.


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