Sorbaria sorbifolia (L.) A. Braun

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbaria sorbifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbaria/sorbaria-sorbifolia/). Accessed 2020-08-09.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Spiraea sorbifolia L .

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbaria sorbifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbaria/sorbaria-sorbifolia/). Accessed 2020-08-09.

A shrub 3 to 6 ft high, which suckers freely; stems erect, very pithy, varying from nearly glabrous to downy. Leaves 8 to 12 in. long, composed of thirteen to twenty-five leaflets, which are lanceolate, 2 to 312 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide, sharply and conspicuously double-toothed, green on both sides; usually quite glabrous above and the same beneath. Flowers 13 in. across, white, produced during July and August in a stiff erect raceme 6 to 10 in. high; flower-stalks downy and glandular; ovaries glabrous or nearly so.

S. sorbifolia, besides being the type of the genus Sorbaria, is the most widely distributed of the species, extending from W. Siberia to the Pacific; how far the typical state extends outside Russia is uncertain, but probably to N. China and Korea. It is also the oldest representative of the genus in gardens, cultivated by Miller in the Chelsea Physic garden in 1759. It is distinguished from its near allies S. aitchisonii and S. tomentosa by its comparatively dwarf, stiff habit, and narrower, stiffer flower-panicles. Grown in rich soil it makes a handsome shrub.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This wide-ranging species was reintroduced to Kew in 1982 from South Korea (B.E. & C. 202). The seed was collected from plants 12-15 ft high.


var. stellipila Maxim.

Synonyms
S. stellipila (Maxim.) Schneid

This differs chiefly in the leaves being clothed with stellate hairs beneath, and in the downy ovaries. In habit and form of leaf it resembles the type. Native of Japan.S. grandiflora (Sw.) Maxim. Spiraea grandiflora Sw.; Sp. sorbifolia var. alpina Pall.; Sp. pallasii G. Don; S. pallasii Pojark.; S. alpina (Pall.) Dipp. – Previously treated as a variety of S. sorbifolia, this differs from it in its dwarf habit (less than 3 ft high in the wild), fewer and shorter leaflets with somewhat blunter teeth, and by the larger flowers, {1/2} to {5/8} in. across. Native of E. Siberia and the Russian Far East.

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