Sequoia

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sequoia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sequoia/). Accessed 2020-09-22.

Family

  • Taxodiaceae

Species in genus

Glossary

appressed
Lying flat against an object.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
peltate
Disc-shaped and attached at centre of lower surface to a stalk (e.g. leaf of Nasturtium Tropaeolum majus).

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sequoia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sequoia/). Accessed 2020-09-22.

A genus of a single species, distinguished within the Taxodium family by the following combination of characters: leaves persistent, of two forms, needle-like and apparently two-ranked on lateral branchlets, scale-like and loosely appressed on leading and fertile shoots; male cones minute, solitary, terminal or axillary on short twigs. Female cones ripening first year, with up to twenty peltate scales, each bearing up to seven seeds. See also Sequoiadendron. It was once thought that Sequoia was widely distributed in the northern hemisphere in pre-glacial times, but since the discovery of Metasequoia it has come to be realised that many sequoia-like fossil remains belong to that genus and not to Sequoia.

The genus was named by Endlicher in 1847 in honour of the talented Sequoiah (d. 1843), son of a British trader and a Cherokee Indian woman. He devised an alphabet for the Cherokee tongue, thanks to which the tribe quickly became literate and even had a newspaper in their own language. But neither he, nor his tribe, ever lived within the area of the redwoods.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.