Senecio monroi Hook. f.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Senecio monroi' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/senecio/senecio-monroi/). Accessed 2020-11-29.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Brachyglottis monroi (Hook. f.) B. Nord.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
section
(sect.) Subdivision of a genus.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Senecio monroi' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/senecio/senecio-monroi/). Accessed 2020-11-29.

An evergreen, much branched shrub up to 4 ft high; young shoots, leaf-stalks, under-surface of leaves and flower-stalks all covered with a whitish felt. Leaves oblong, oval, or rather obovate, conspicuously wrinkled or wavy at the margin, rounded at the apex, tapered at the base; 34 to 2 in. long, 14 to 58 in. wide, dull green, sticky and glabrous above; stalk 14 to 38 in. long. Flower-heads in terminal compound corymbs, each section carrying three to five; the flower-head is 12 to 34 in. wide, carrying ten to fifteen bright yellow ray-florets; flower-stalks long and slender, glandular-downy and sometimes also white-felted; involucral-scales glandular-downy, sometimes also white-felted. Bot. Mag., t. 8698.

Native of the South Island of New Zealand, up to elevations of from 1,000 to 4,500 ft. The species is distinct in its wrinkled leaf-margins and glandular-downy flower-stalks, its nearest ally being S. compactus which has whitish, felted, but not glandular flower-stalks and usually only faintly wrinkled leaves. It is a handsome shrub whose inflorences may be 4 to 6 in. wide and are borne in July. No one succeeded better with it than the late Canon Boscawen at Ludgvan Rectory, near Penzance, or Lord Wakehurst in Sussex, who had a plant 412 ft high and 9 ft in diameter. At Kew it just misses being hardy in a sheltered nook, but survives our milder winters.