Senecio laxifolius Buchan.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Senecio laxifolius' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/senecio/senecio-laxifolius/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • S. greyi Hort., in part
  • S. laxiflorus Hort.
  • S. latifolius Hort.
  • Brachyglottis laxifolia (Buchan.) B. Nord.

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
crenate
With rounded teeth at the edge.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Senecio laxifolius' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/senecio/senecio-laxifolius/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

A laxly branched, evergreen shrub, 2 to 4 ft high, of bushy habit; young stems covered with grey down when young. Leaves alternate, 1 to 3 in. long, 12 to 114 in. wide, elliptic to oblong-elliptic, mostly blunt at the apex, tapering at the base, obscurely crenate or entire, covered above when young with a grey, cobweb-like down, afterwards nearly glabrous, under-surface clothed with close white felt; stalk slender, 38 to 1 in. long. Flower-heads 1 in. across, produced in summer in loose, terminal, broadly pyramidal panicles, 5 to 8 in. long, 3 to 5 in. wide. Ray-florets twelve to fifteen, golden yellow, fully spread; disk-florets very small and numerous, forming collectively a reddish brown centre 14 in. across. Bot. Mag., t. 7378.

Native of the mountains of the Nelson and Canterbury provinces of New Zealand, at 2,500 to 5,000 ft. It needs somewhat milder climatic conditions than those of east and middle England, and although several times tried in the open at Kew, it has never survived more than two or three winters except in specially sheltered nooks. In the slightly milder parts of the country it succeeds admirably.

S. laxifolius has been much confused with S. greyi and especially with S. Dunedin Hybrids, which latter have long been erroneously referred to as S. laxifolius in British gardens. The true S. laxifolius appears to be very rare in cultivation in the British Isles.

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