Senecio huntii F. v. Muell.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Senecio huntii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/senecio/senecio-huntii/). Accessed 2020-12-02.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Brachyglottis huntii (F. v. Muell.) B. Nord.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
viscid
Sticky.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Senecio huntii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/senecio/senecio-huntii/). Accessed 2020-12-02.

An evergreen shrub or small tree of rounded form 6 to 20 ft high; young shoots clothed with glandular down, viscid, stout. Leaves stalkless, narrowly oblong or narrowly obovate, pointed or blunt at the apex, tapered towards the base, entire, 2 to 412 in. long, 34 to 1 in. wide, downy above, felted beneath when young, becoming almost glabrous above with age and thinly rusty-downy beneath. Flower-heads very numerous and densely produced in terminal, rounded, or pyramidal panicles 3 to 5 in. wide. Each flower-head is 12 to 34 in. wide, with fifteen to twenty yellow ray-florets; flower-stalks slender, glandular-hairy.

Native of the Chatham Islands, where it is described as forming a small tree handsome in its pale shining green leaves and bright yellow, copious blossoms. It is also of distinct appearance, with leaves rather resembling those of a shrubby spurge in their shape and close arrangement at the end of the branches. It is unfortunately not hardy in most parts of the country, but succeeds on the southern and western seaboards. It is at Monreith in Wigtownshire, where it commences to flower in June. Major A. A. Dorrien-Smith collected plants in the Chatham Islands in December 1909, when it was just coming into blossom.

S. huntii × S. Dunedin Hybrids – A garden hybrid, similar in appearance to S. huntti but with grey-green foliage, the leaves being grey-cottony above and densely grey- or white-felted beneath. Not known for certain to be in cultivation in the British Isles.