Senecio compactus Kirk

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Senecio compactus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/senecio/senecio-compactus/). Accessed 2020-12-02.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Brachyglottis compacta (Kirk) B. Nord.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glandular
Bearing glands.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Senecio compactus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/senecio/senecio-compactus/). Accessed 2020-12-02.

An evergreen shrub of compact, much branched habit, 2 to 4 ft high, spreading twice as wide; young shoots, undersurface of leaves and flower-stalks all clothed with a pure white, dense felt. Leaves obovate or oval, rounded at the apex, tapered at the base, the lower larger ones mostly wavy at the margin, the small upper ones almost or quite entire; they are 12 to 2 in. long, 14 to 1 in. wide, becoming smaller near the inflorescence, upper surface dark dull green, with persistent white margins when seen from above; stalks 14 to 34 in. long, felted. Flower-heads 34 to 1 in. wide, three to ten of them forming a terminal raceme; ray-florets about twelve, bright yellow.

Native of the North Island, New Zealand. This handsome shrub is unfortunately not quite hardy near London, but is capable of surviving moderate winters if given a sheltered nook and a slight covering during cold spells. In the south and south-west it grows admirably without protection. Its compact habit, small leaves with crinkled margins, and clusters of racemes each terminating a slender shoot of the year, renders it distinct. It flowers in January and February in New Zealand and in the corresponding antipodal months (July and August) here. It occurs wild on limestone. Its nearesr relative is S. monroi which has conspicuously wavy margined, narrower leaves and glandular flower-stalks.