Schisandra propinqua (Wall.) Baill.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Schisandra propinqua' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/schisandra/schisandra-propinqua/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Kadsura propinqua Wall.
  • Sphaerostema propinquum (Wall.) Bl.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
cuneate
Wedge-shaped.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
perianth
Calyx and corolla. Term used especially when petals and sepals are not easily distinguished from each other.
petiole
Leaf stalk.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Schisandra propinqua' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/schisandra/schisandra-propinqua/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

A tall evergreen climber with glabrous, angled young stems. Leaves rather thin, ovate-lanceolate, narrowly oblong-ovate or almost elliptic, 2 to 5 in. long, 34 to 2 in. wide, rounded or broad-cuneate at the base, narrowed at the apex, glabrous, finely toothed or almost entire; petiole about 1 in. long. Flowers usually solitary, the outer segments greenish yellow, the inner orange, about 58 in. wide, borne on stalks not more than 1 in. long. Males with up to ten perianth segments, the stamens united into a more or less globose head. Female flowers with more numerous segments than in the male. Mature carpels scarlet, in spikes up to 6 in. long: Bot. Mag., t. 4614.

Native of the Himalaya; in cultivation 1828. It is a tender species, at one time cultivated in greenhouses.


var. chinensis Oliver

Leaves narrow-lanceolate or narrowly lanceolate-oblong, {3/8} to 1 in. or slightly more wide, sometimes marbled with white. Flowers yellowish, borne in late summer; introduced by Wilson in 1907 from W. Hupeh, China. According to him it is a common species up to about 3,300 ft, growing in rocky places; he saw it always less than 10 ft high. It is hardier than the Himalayan plant and like it is easily distinguished from other species by its short-stalked flowers. Since they open so late, it would probably be necessary to grow both sexes of this variety if fruits are to be seen.

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