Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Schisandra chinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/schisandra/schisandra-chinensis/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Kadsura chinensis Turcz.
  • S. japonica (Sieb. & Zucc. ex A. Gr.) Hance
  • Sphaerostema japonicum Sieb. & Zucc. ex A. Gr.
  • Maximowiczia chinensis (Turcz.) Rupr.

Glossary

berry
Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
spike
Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Schisandra chinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/schisandra/schisandra-chinensis/). Accessed 2020-10-24.

A deciduous, climbing shrub, growing 20 to 30 ft high; branchlets red, round, not downy, set with wart-like lenticels. Leaves 2 to 4 in. long, obovate or elliptical, tapering at the base to a slender stalk, remotely toothed; glabrous except on the principal veins beneath when young. Flowers produced during April and May, each on a slender stalk 1 in. long, two or three of them being borne in a cluster at the base of the young growths; they are pale rose-coloured, fragrant, 12 to 34 in. across. After the female flowers are past, that portion bearing the carpels continues to lengthen until it is 2 to 6 in. long, and on it the berry-like, scarlet fruits are borne on a sort of pendulous spike. These remain on the plant during the winter. Male flowers with four or five stamens.

Native of China, Japan, Korea, Sakhalin and the Amur region; introduced in 1860. Although not showy in flower (the petals soon drop), its scarlet fruits are very handsome. The dried wood is charmingly fragrant.

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