Salvia microphylla H.B.K.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salvia microphylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salvia/salvia-microphylla/). Accessed 2020-01-21.

Genus

Synonyms

  • S. grahamii Benth.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salvia microphylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salvia/salvia-microphylla/). Accessed 2020-01-21.

An evergreen shrub up to 3 or 4 ft high; young shoots soft, slender, square, downy, reddish purple. Leaves opposite, ovate, round-toothed, 1 to 112 in. long (to 3 in. on sterile shoots); dull green and slightly downy on both surfaces; stalk 14 to 1 in. long. Flowers produced mostly in pairs on terminal racemes up to 6 in. long, opening successively from June onwards. They are about 1 in. long, the lip of the corolla 12 to 34 in. wide, rich red on first opening, changing with age to magenta-purple; the upper, hooded part of the corolla is rosy red. Calyx tubular, 13 in. long, ribbed, downy, reddish above.

Native of Mexico; introduced by G. J. Graham about 1830 to the Horticultural Society’s garden at Chiswick and described by Bentham under the still familiar name of S. grahamii. But Bentham was aware that Graham’s salvia was very near to the earlier-named S. microphylla, and there can be no doubt that the two represent states of the same species, the type of S. microphylla being dwarfer and with smaller leaves than the type of S. grahamii but otherwise essentially the same.

S. microphylla is quite hardy in the south and south-western counties and even in less favoured parts will live for several years in a sheltered nook or against a wall. There is no difficulty in keeping up a stock, as cuttings root most freely and will flower well in the following summer. A peculiarity of the plant is the strong odour given off by the leaves when they are crushed or rubbed. This almost exactly resembles the odour of black currant leaves.


var. neurepia (Fern.) Epling

Synonyms
S. neurepia Fern.
S. grahamii Hort., in part

Leaves on the flowering stems 1{1/2} to 3 in. long, light green, rather thin. Flowers, at least on cultivated plants, with a clear bright red lower lip. This is commoner in gardens than the type and of the same order of hardiness.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.