Salix sericea Marsh.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix sericea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-sericea/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

Genus

Synonyms

  • S. petiolaris var. sericea (Marsh.) Anderss.
  • S. pennsylvanica Forbes

Glossary

ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
acute
Sharply pointed.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix sericea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-sericea/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

A shrub to about 15 ft high; branchlets glabrous or silky, brown, brittle at the base; winter-buds abruptly acute at the apex. Leaves lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, up to 4 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide, slenderly acuminate at the apex, finely serrated throughout, silky on both sides when young, usually permanently so beneath, becoming dark green and glossy above; petiole to 12 in. long. Catkins appearing in spring before the leaves, about 1 in. long, the females elongating in the fruiting stage; scales dark. Stamens two, the anthers red when young. Ovary short-stalked, ovoid, blunt at the apex, silky; stigmas almost sessile.

Native of eastern N. America; in cultivation 1829 and introduced on several occasions since. Although now uncommon in gardens it is one of the most ornamental of the medium-sized willows. It is grouped with the European S. repens by some authorities, but its taxonomic position is controversial.

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