Salix pyrenaica Gouan

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix pyrenaica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-pyrenaica/). Accessed 2020-02-23.

Genus

Synonyms

  • S. ciliata DC.

Glossary

ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bifid
Divided up to halfway into two parts.
endemic
(of a plant or an animal) Found in a native state only within a defined region or country.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lax
Loose or open.
obtuse
Blunt.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix pyrenaica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-pyrenaica/). Accessed 2020-02-23.

A dense shrub with procumbent main stems and ascending branches, up to 3 ft high though commonly only half that height; branchlets soon glabrous, reddish brown. Leaves broadly oval, ovate-elliptic or obovate, 34 to 114 in. long, upper surface green, fairly glossy, with scattered long hairs, underside at first hairy all over, becoming glabrous except on the main veins, margins entire, fringed with long hairs; petiole about 316 in. long. Catkins lax, borne on leafy peduncles; scales obtuse, sparsely hairy. Stamens glabrous with purplish anthers. Ovary ovoid, woolly, almost sessile; style sometimes divided at the apex, stigmas bifid, the divisions slender.

An endemic of the Pyrenees and the Cantabrian mountains, allied to S. glauca. It is one of the first willows to have been recorded scientifically, for it was found by the Netherlands botanist Charles de l’Escluse (Clusius) during his journey to France, Spain and Portugal, 1561-5, and figured by him in a work of 1601. It was introduced to Britain in 1823 and reintroduced early this century.


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