Salix moupinensis Franch.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix moupinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-moupinensis/). Accessed 2020-02-23.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bifid
Divided up to halfway into two parts.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix moupinensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-moupinensis/). Accessed 2020-02-23.

A deciduous shrub or small tree which Wilson found 10 to 20 ft high; young shoots glabrous, becoming yellowish or reddish brown; winter buds slender, 14 to 12 in. long and of a similar colour. Leaves oval or obovate, broadly tapered or almost rounded at the base, abruptly pointed at the apex, finely and regularly toothed, each tooth tipped with a gland, 2 to 5 in. long, 1 to 214 in. wide, upper surface bright green, glabrous, with a yellowish midrib; lower surface yellowish green, wrinkled with veins, usually more or less silky on the midrib if only when young; stalk 14 to 58 in. long, glabrous or silky. Catkins very slender, the female up to 5 in. long; styles two, bifid; males shorter. Catkin-scales sparsely hairy or glabrous.

Native of W. Szechwan, China; discovered by the Abbé David in 1869, later by Henry; introduced by Wilson to the Arnold Arboretum in 1910 and thence to Kew in 1912. This willow is closely related to S. fargesii (q.v. for the points of difference). It is hardy, and handsome as willows go, but is not so outstanding as Farges’ willow, nor so common in gardens.


Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.