Salix irrorata Anderss.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix irrorata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-irrorata/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

Genus

Glossary

ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
acuminate
Narrowing gradually to a point.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
bifid
Divided up to halfway into two parts.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
clone
Organism arising via vegetative or asexual reproduction.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
obtuse
Blunt.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
pruinose
Covered with a waxy bloom (as found on a plum).
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix irrorata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-irrorata/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

A shrub to about 15 ft high, rarely a small tree; young stems glabrous, purplish by winter and coated with a ‘whitish bloom; winter-buds large, roundish, glabrous. Leaves 212 to 4 in. long, oblong or narrowly lanceolate, acuminate, glabrous, bright green above, glaucous beneath, remotely toothed or entire; petiole 18 to 38 in. long. Catkins dense, almost sessile, appearing before the leaves, 1 in. or slightly more long; scales dark at the tips, obtuse, densely hairy. Stamens with glabrous filaments and reddish anthers. Ovary glabrous, very shortly stalked; style short, with stout, entire or bifid stigmas.

Native of the south-western USA (Colorado, S.E. Arizona and western New Mexico), common along mountain streams; introduced to Kew from the Arnold Arboretum in 1910 (a male clone). With its bloomy stems it is ornamental in winter, though no more so than S. daphnoides, from which it differs in its almost entire, very shortly stalked leaves and smaller catkins. Once established it should be pruned hard each spring. Award of Merit 1967. The specific epithet means ‘dewy’, in allusion to the pruinose stems.

S. lasiolepis Benth. – Closely allied to S. irrorata and described one year earlier. The main difference appears to be that the mature stems are not bloomy (except in some areas where the species overlap) and that they and the leaves are usually downy when young. Its catkins are somewhat longer.

The affinity of these two species is uncertain and controversial. At any rate, S. irrorata, despite its bloomy stems, is in no way related to S. daphnoides. Even in winter it is distinguished by its appressed, beetle-shaped buds, very different from the diverging buds of S. daphnoides and its allies.

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