Salix hookeriana Barratt

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix hookeriana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-hookeriana/). Accessed 2020-09-26.

Genus

Glossary

acute
Sharply pointed.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
authority
The author(s) of a plant name. The names of these authors are stated directly after the plant name often abbreviated. For example Quercus L. (L. = Carl Linnaeus); Rhus wallichii Hook. f. (Hook. f. = Joseph Hooker filius i.e. son of William Hooker). Standard reference for the abbreviations: Brummitt & Powell (1992).
cuneate
Wedge-shaped.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
indumentum
A covering of hairs or scales.
obtuse
Blunt.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
reticulate
Arranged in a net-like manner.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Salix hookeriana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/salix/salix-hookeriana/). Accessed 2020-09-26.

A shrub to about 6 ft high in cultivation and normally no taller in the wild, though exceptionally it attains there the dimensions of a small tree; branches stout; young growths densely hairy and remaining so through the winter. Stipules very small, or lacking, except on strong shoots. Leaves oblong-elliptic, oblong-ovate or obovate, acute to obtuse at the apex, cuneate at the base, mostly 112 to 3 in. long and 34 to 112 in. wide, upper surface soon glabrous, glossy and reticulate, underside with an indumentum of variable persistence and density, sometimes almost glabrous and glaucous, sometimes, as in the cultivated plants, permanently coated with a loose, soft, whitish felt, margins obscurely toothed; petiole 38 to 34 in. long. Catkins produced before or with the leaves, sessile or short-stalked; bracts long-hairy, dark brown. Male catkins stout, 1 to 2 in long; stamens two, free, with glabrous filaments. Female catkins 134 to 412 in. long; ovaries glabrous or hairy, short-stalked; style short, but longer than the slightly bilobed stigmas.

Native of the coastal regions of western N. America from Alaska to California. Although introduced to Kew towards the end of the last century it is scarcely known in gardens and deserves to be more widely grown, judging from the plants in the Hillier Arboretum, which make stiffly branched shrubs of picturesque habit, about 6 ft high (1979). They are male and we are told by the Canadian authority Dr George Argus, who kindly confirmed their identity, that they represent the tomentose form of the species. Never occurring far from the sea in its native habitats, S. hookeriana might succeed in exposed coastal gardens.

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