Rhododendron martinianum Balf. f. & Forr.

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Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron martinianum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-martinianum/). Accessed 2020-08-04.

Genus

Infraspecifics

Other species in genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
Tibet
Traditional English name for the formerly independent state known to its people as Bod now the Tibet (Xizang) Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The name Xizang is used in lists of Chinese provinces.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
mucro
Short straight point. mucronate Bearing a mucro.
reflexed
Folded backwards.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Rhododendron martinianum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/rhododendron/rhododendron-martinianum/). Accessed 2020-08-04.

Much-branched shrub, 0.8-3.5 m; young shoots usually stalked- or setose-glandular. Leaves 4.5-5 x 1.4-2.4 cm, elliptic to obovate, lower surface punctulate, otherwise glabrous; or (rarely) with a few tufts of hairs, even at maturity; petioles with a few setulose glands or more or less glabrous at maturity. Flowers solitary or up to 4, in a lax truss; calyx 1-3 mm; corolla pale yellow, or white flushed rose to pink, with or without purple flecks, funnel-campanulate, nectar pouches lacking, c.30 mm; ovary and style base densely stalked-glandular. Flowering April-May. Royal Horticultural Society (1997)

Distribution  China SE Tibet, NW Yunnan

Habitat 3,000-4,250 m

RHS Hardiness Rating H6

Conservation status Vulnerable (VU)

Taxonomic note Closely allied to R. selense but distinguished by its smaller leaves and fewer flowers per truss. In the wild it apparently has a narrower corolla but it is not certain whether this is a consistent diagnostic character. Royal Horticultural Society (1997)

An evergreen shrub 3 to 6 ft high, with slender but stiff young shoots furnished with glands. Leaves clustered at the end of the shoot, oval inclined to oblong, abruptly tapered towards both ends, ending in a very distinct mucro; 34 to 134 in. long, half as much wide; more or less glandular when young, eventually glabrous or nearly so, rather glaucous beneath; stalk 14 in. long, glandular. Flowers two or three together in a terminal cluster each on a glandular stalk up to 114 in. long. Calyx small, fringed with glands. Corolla widely funnel-shaped, five-lobed, 1 in. long, 2 in. wide, pale rose with a dark blotch at the base, often speckled with crimson, the lobes reflexed. Stamens ten, downy at the base. Ovary and base of style glandular. (s. Thomsonii ss. Selense)

Native of N.W. Yunnan, bordering parts of S.E. Tibet, and of upper Burma; introduced by Forrest in 1914 and also in cultivation from seeds collected by Rock and by Kingdon Ward. It is named after John Martin, who had charge of the rhododendrons at Caerhays Castle, Cornwall. In its best forms, with clear pink flowers heavily freckled with crimson and borne on a low compact bush, this is one of the most charming of rhododendrons, but is rarely met with in gardens. Kingdon Ward’s 6795 from the Seinghku valley, upper Burma, is unusual in having roundish leaves, recalling those of R. thomsonii.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

R. eurysiphon – Wrongly placed here. See this supplement under R. stewartianum.


R eurysiphon Tagg & Forr

This species is closely allied to R. martinianum, differing in its campanulate instead of funnel-campanulate corolla. It is possibly a natural hybrid between it and R. stewartianum.

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