Quercus conspersa Benth.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus conspersa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-conspersa/). Accessed 2021-11-28.

Genus

  • Quercus
  • Subgen. Quercus, Sect. Lobatae

Synonyms

  • Q. candolleana Trel.
  • Q. vexans Trel.

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Quercus conspersa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/quercus/quercus-conspersa/). Accessed 2021-11-28.

Tree to 15 m, 0.5 m dbh. Branchlets reddish brown and glabrous, with numerous white lenticels. Leaves deciduous, (8–)11–17(–22) × (2–)3–6.5 cm, elliptic-ovate to lanceolate or oblanceolate, leathery, immature leaves reddish with simple and stellate tomentum, mature leaves glabrous, but with some glandular or stellate tomentum along the midrib at the base of the leaf, 7–10 conspicuous secondary veins on each side of the midrib, margins revolute and entire or with one to five teeth near the apex, apex acuminate or acute; petiole 0.8–1.5 cm long, reddish and pubescent. Infructescence 1.5–2 cm long with one cupule. Cupule hemispheric, 1.5–2.2 × 0.6–0.8 cm, margin curved inwards; scales obtuse, covered in white pubescence. Acorn ovoid, with about one-third of its length enclosed in the cupule, 1.2–2 cm long, stylopodium persistent. Fruiting December to February of the following year (Mexico). Gonzalez & Labat 1987, Romero Rangel et al. 2002. Distribution MEXICO: Chiapas, Guerrero, Jalisco, México, Michoacán, Nuevo León, Oaxaca, Veracruz. Habitat Oak and pine forests between 400 and 2200 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 7–8. Conservation status Least Concern. Illustration Gonzalez & Labat 1987, Romero Rangel et al. 2002; NT698.

The only specimens of Quercus conspersa observed for the present work are two trees of 6 and 7 m (2008) at Chevithorne Barton, which are growing well although with a rather sparse appearance. The leaves are dark green, and are noticeably more toothed in the upper part of the tree. The species is also cultivated by enthusiasts in France.