Pyrus betulifolia Bunge

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pyrus betulifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pyrus/pyrus-betulifolia/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corymb
Unbranched inflorescence with lateral flowers the pedicels of which are of different lengths making the inflorescence appear flat-topped.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pyrus betulifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pyrus/pyrus-betulifolia/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

A slender, quick-growing, graceful tree 20 to 30 ft high; young shoots covered thickly with a grey felt which persists the whole of the year. Leaves ovate or roundish ovate, 2 to 3 in. long, 114 to 112 in. wide, long-pointed, tapered or rounded at the base, regularly and sometimes rather coarsely serrated, downy on both surfaces at first, remaining so on the veins beneath throughout the season; dark green, glabrous and lustrous above; stalk 1 to 114 in. long, grey-felted like the shoot. Flowers eight to ten together in a corymb, white, each about 34 in. across, on a downy stalk 34 to 1 in. long; styles two or three; calyx downy, its short triangular teeth falling away from the small roundish fruit, which is about the size of a large pea, greyish brown with white dots.

Native of N. China; introduced to Kew in 1882 through seeds sent by Dr Bretschneider. The chief characteristics of the tree are its quick graceful growth, and small fruits not crowned by calyx teeth. Its fruit would appear to be of no value, but the tree is used by the Chinese as a stock on which they graft fruiting pears.


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