Purshia tridentata (Pursh) DC.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Purshia tridentata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/purshia/purshia-tridentata/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Tigasea tridentata Pursh

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    style
    Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Purshia tridentata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/purshia/purshia-tridentata/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

    A deciduous grey shrub 3 to 6 ft high in cultivation, but occasionally 10 ft in the wild; young branchlets downy. Leaves wedge-shaped or obovate, 18 to 58 in. long, 12 to 14 in. wide towards the apex, where it is cut into three large, rounded teeth, tapering gradually towards the base, covered with white down beneath, grey-green and downy above. Flowers yellow, almost stalkless, produced in May, usually singly from buds on twigs of the previous year’s wood; calyx covered with grey down, intermixed with gland-tipped hairs, funnel-shaped, five-lobed; stamens numerous, arranged in a ring. Each flower is about 13 in. wide. Fruits 12 in. long, downy, crowned with the persistent style.

    Native of western N. America, from British Columbia to California; introduced by Douglas in 1826, first flowered in the Horticultural Society’s Garden in 1830. According to Loudon, all the plants about London were killed during the winter of 1837-8, but plants grew unsheltered in a border at Kew for over twenty years. Unfortunately these have now been lost. It is not a very attractive shrub, although curious and interesting. It prefers a rather light soil, and can be propagated by layers.


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