Pterocarya paliurus Batal.

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Credits

Julian Sutton (2019)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. (2019), 'Pterocarya paliurus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pterocarya/pterocarya-paliurus/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Cyclocarya paliurus (Batal.) Iljinskaya

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
nut
Dry indehiscent single-seeded fruit with woody outer wall.
synonym
(syn.) (botanical) An alternative or former name for a taxon usually considered to be invalid (often given in brackets). Synonyms arise when a taxon has been described more than once (the prior name usually being the one accepted as correct) or if an article of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature has been contravened requiring the publishing of a new name. Developments in taxonomic thought may be reflected in an increasing list of synonyms as generic or specific concepts change over time.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Julian Sutton (2019)

Recommended citation
Sutton, J. (2019), 'Pterocarya paliurus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pterocarya/pterocarya-paliurus/). Accessed 2020-09-25.

see Cyclocarya paliurus

A tree 50 or more ft high, the young shoots downy, glandular. Leaves 8 to 12 in. long composed usually of seven or nine leaflets, which are oblong or oval, very obliquely tapered or rounded at the base, pointed or blunt at the apex, finely toothed, 212 to 5 in. long, 1 to 212 in. wide, dark glossy green, and glabrous except for fine down on the midrib on both surfaces; common stalk not winged, downy. Male catkins slender, 212 to 4 in. long, frequently in pairs. Fruiting catkin 8 to 10 in. long, each nut surrounded by a wing, the whole forming a circular disk 112 to 212 in. across.

Native of the mountains of Central China; discovered by Henry in 1888, and introduced by Wilson for Messrs Veitch in 1901. The fruits of this species are very remarkable, suggesting miniature cymbals; in having the wing continuous all round the nut, they distinguish it from all other species. Seeds were again sent by Wilson during his later journeys.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

The proposed new genus Cyclocarya (see synonym) is reduced to the level of a subgenus of Pterocarya by Wayne E. Manning in Bull. Torr. Club, Vol. 102, pp. 157-66 (1975).

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