Prunus × dawyckensis Sealy

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Prunus × dawyckensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/prunus/prunus-x-dawyckensis/). Accessed 2019-12-07.

Genus

Common Names

  • Dawyck Cherry

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Prunus × dawyckensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/prunus/prunus-x-dawyckensis/). Accessed 2019-12-07.

A deciduous cherry up to about 16 ft high; young shoots hairy, grey to purplish, becoming shining, glabrous and warty later. Leaves broadly oval to obovate, 2 to 5 in. long, 112 to 212 in. wide (those of the flowering shoots smaller), more or less slenderly pointed, coarsely round-toothed, slightly hairy above, glaucous-green and more or less hairy beneath. Flowers in shortly stalked downy umbels of two or three blossoms, each 58 in. across, petals roundish, overlapping, pale pink; style glabrous. Fruit a globose, scarlet-crimson cherry, 12 in. wide, stalk about 1 in. long. Bot. Mag., t. 9519.

Origin not definitely known, but most probably introduced from W. China early in the present century by E. H. Wilson. It is near enough to P. dielsiana and P. canescens to have suggested its being a hybrid between them. The original plant is at Dawyck in Peeblesshire.


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